A New UK Initiative To Cut The Time Taken To Diagnose Cancer.

After officials from Cwm Taf health board saw how the Danish health service had reduced its time to diagnose cancer and improved its cancer survival rates, a new pilot in Wales has been established which will focus on patients who GPs suspect may have cancer but do not show obvious or pressing symptoms.

Denmark established a number of diagnostic centers in efforts to transform cancer care following concerns that the country was lagging behind the best in the world on survival rates.  In addition, they wanted to reduce the time it takes to diagnose cancer.

Now 40 GPs in the Cynon Valley who might only have a gut feeling that something is wrong, can refer those patients directly to a new “one-stop” diagnostic centre at the Royal Glamorgan hospital in Llantrisant within a week, based on the Denmark findings

This is estimated to be about six patients each week, who will receive an examination and different tests,  all on the same day at the new clinic in Wales and a similar clinic may be established at Neath Port Talbot Hospital as part of a second trial run by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg health board.

Dr Gareth Davies, associate director of the Wales Cancer Network, said

“If the GP sees a patient and is not exactly sure what’s going on and has a sixth sense something is wrong, it will allow the GP to refer the patient straight into that clinic.”

If this is successful within the next six months, it will be rolled out across the rest of the health board area.

To see the full report from the BBC

Click here

or go to

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-39553971?intlink_from_url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/topics/583f320b-e25a-433c-ad39-b637a4f27866/cancer&link_location=live-reporting-story

 

Further reading

Brain training reduces chemotherapy-induced nerve damage in cancer survivor

Could the UK face delays getting new drugs after Brexit?

How Diet Influences Your Risk Of Cancer

Dr Shara Cohen

Dr Cohen started her working life as a research scientist and lecturer with over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications.

She followed a classical scientific career until she left mainstream science in 2000 (which coincided with the birth of her first daughter) to establish the Life Science Communications company, Euroscicon Ltd.

Euroscicon Ltd was her first company (which she sold in 2016).

In 2013 she was diagnosed with Cancer and set up Cancer Care Parcel

She also works with and establishes businesses and charities which benefit local, national and international communities via her company – The Pein Consultancy Ltd

Leave a reply